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Simon is a professional Tai Chi teacher.  Like so many of us, he wanted to experience more “spaciousness and presence” in his life and “achieve a better balance between work and family life and not get so bound up in knots”. 

During the Vision Board Workshop it can feel quite luxurious to take all the time you need to flick through magazines without an agenda; to savour choosing and arranging images without pre-planning or censorship.  Working at this leisurely pace, allows the creative side of our brain to open up like a flower and inspiration and innovation to get through to you.

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Towards the close of the workshop when others were finished and presenting their boards, Simon  had considerable empty space on his and a pile of images still to sort through.  As a seasoned Vision Board facilitator I’m perfectly happy to see these empty spaces, knowing there will be good reason for it which the unconscious mind knows the reason for and the concious

mind has yet to catch up and comprehend.  Simon, however, left feeling disgruntled and talked about finishing his board at home.

One image had caught my eye right in the centre of his board.  It ‘felt’ edgy and slightly controversial and I felt happy and sad to see it there.

Days later I had a niggling concern that Simon was not in love with his board (which most people are with theirs) and I wondered if it was to do with the image at the heart of it.  I got in touch and hoped I could help him arrive at a more positive inclination towards the image. 

Another two months were to elapse before we finally got together for an in-depth session.  To my surprise the first thing I noticed was the controversial image had disappeared.  The second surprise was that most of the empty space on the board had been filled.  I was puzzling over this when Simon announced: “I’m delighted with my board now it’s finished.”

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I'd enjoyed seeing the gaps on Simon’s board and the space he’d left around many of the images.  To me it resonated with his desire to increase the number of pauses between activity and to enjoy more a leisurely pace and to be at peace. 

The gaps had now been filled with more literal representations of spaciousness such as the cosmos and the depths of the ocean.  

The absent image had been of a young boy with Downs syndrome wearing a gas mask and flippers on his hands and feet.  It was a joyful picture and made me smile because he looked so present and happy.  But I appreciated it ran close to the mark since Simon’s son also was a Downs boy. 

Simon remembered the image as well but could not account for its disappearance. 
Another little boy had appeared to join the images which represented other family members he said and spoke to me of their collective desire to have a more playful attitude to life. 

Since there were nine images of bathrooms on his board, we also explored how important it was for Simon to create a watery retreat for himself in the home.  With my Feng Shui hat on, we took a closer look at the neglected bathroom and I advised him how to transform it into a floating haven that resonated with the floating motif that ran through the ‘spine’ of his board. 

By the time I left Simon was happily reunited with his vision board. The empty space had been filled in an acceptable way to him while the mysterious disappearance was to remain a mystery.

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